grunt-aws-lambda

A grunt plugin to help develop AWS Lambda functions.

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grunt-aws-lambda
A grunt plugin to assist in developing functions for AWS Lambda.

Build Status
This plugin provides helpers for:
  • Running Lambda functions locally
  • Managing npm dependencies which are required by your function
  • Packaging required dependencies with your function in a Lambda compatible zip
  • Uploading package to Lambda

Getting Started

This plugin requires Grunt ~0.4.5
If you haven't used Grunt before, be sure to check out the Getting Started guide, as it explains how to create a Gruntfile as well as install and use Grunt plugins. Once you're familiar with that process, you may install this plugin with this command:
npm install grunt-aws-lambda --save-dev

Once the plugin has been installed, it may be enabled inside your Gruntfile with this line of JavaScript:
grunt.loadNpmTasks('grunt-aws-lambda');

Gotchas

Add dist to your .npmignore

This will save you from packaging previous packages in future ones.
For example your .npmignore might look something like this:
event.json
Gruntfile.js
dist
*.iml

Read More

Authenticating to AWS

This library supports providing credentials for AWS via an IAM Role, an AWS CLI profile, environment variables, a JSON file on disk, or passed in credentials. To learn more, please see the below section

grunt-aws-lambda tasks

Overview

This plugin contains 3 tasks:
  • lambdainvoke - Wrapper to run and test lambda functions locally and view output.
  • lambdapackage - Packages function along with any npm dependencies in a zip format suitable for lambda.
  • lambdadeploy - Uploads the zip package to lambda.

lambdainvoke and lambdapackage can be used independently, lambdadeploy will invoke lambdapackage before uploading the produced zip file.

lambdainvoke

In your project's Gruntfile, add a section named lambda_invoke to the data object passed into grunt.initConfig().
grunt.initConfig({
    lambda_invoke: {
        default: {
            options: {
                // Task-specific options go here.
            }
        }
    },
});

Options

options.handler
Type: String Default value: handler
Name of the handler function to invoke.
options.filename
Type: String Default value: index.js
Name of your script file which contains your handler function.
options.event
Type: String Default value: event.json
Name of the .json file containing your test event relative to your Gruntfile.

Usage Examples

Default Options
In this example, the default options are used therefore if we have the following in our Gruntfile.js:
grunt.initConfig({
    lambda_invoke: {
        default: {
            options: {
                // Task-specific options go here.
            }
        }
    },
});
And the following in index.js
exports.handler = function (event, context) {
    console.log('value1 = ' + event.key1);
    console.log('value2 = ' + event.key2);
    console.log('value3 = ' + event.key3);

    context.done(null, 'Hello World');  // SUCCESS with message
};

And the following in event.json
{
    "key1": "value1",
    "key2": "value2",
    "key3": "value3"
}

Then we run grunt lambda_invoke, we should get the following output:
Running "lambda_invoke" task

value1 = value1
value2 = value2
value3 = value3

Message
-------
Hello World

Done, without errors.

lambdapackage

This task generates a lambda package including npm dependencies using the default npm install functionality.
In your project's Gruntfile, add a section named lambda_package to the data object passed into grunt.initConfig().
grunt.initConfig({
    lambda_package: {
        default: {
            options: {
                // Task-specific options go here.
            }
        }
    },
});

Options

options.includefiles
Type: Array Default value: []
List of files to explicitly include in the package, even if they would be ignored by NPM
options.includetime
Type: Boolean Default value: true
Whether or not to timestamp the packages, if set to true the current date/time will be included in the zip name, if false then the package name will be constant and consist of just the package name and version.
options.includeversion
Type: Boolean Default value: true
Whether or not to include the NPM package version in the artifact package name. Set to false if you'd prefer a static package file name regardless of the version.
options.packagefolder
Type: String Default value: ./
The path to your npm package, must contain the package.json file.
options.distfolder
Type: String Default value: dist
The folder where the complete zip files should be saved relative to the Gruntfile.

Usage Examples

Default Options
In this example, the default options are used therefore if we have the following in our Gruntfile.js:
grunt.initConfig({
    lambda_package: {
        default: {
            options: {
                // Task-specific options go here.
            }
        }
    },
});
And the following in package.json
{
    "name": "my-lambda-function",
    "description": "An Example Lamda Function",
    "version": "0.0.1",
    "private": "true",
    "dependencies": {
        "jquery": "2.1.1"
    },
    "devDependencies": {
        "grunt": "0.4.*",
        "grunt-pack": "0.1.*",
        "grunt-aws-lambda": "0.1.*"
    }
}

Then we run grunt lambda_package, we should see a new zip file in a new folder called dist called something like:
my-lambda-function_0-0-1_2014-10-30-18-29-4.zip
If you unzip that and look inside you should see something like:
index.js
package.json
node_modules/
node_modules/jquery
node_modules/jquery/... etc

Given that by default the dist folder is inside your function folder you can easily end up bundling previous packages inside subsequent packages therefore it is strongly advised that you add dist to your .npmignore.
For example your .npmignore might look something like this:
event.json
Gruntfile.js
dist
*.iml

lambdadeploy

In your project's Gruntfile, add a section named lambda_deploy to the data object passed into grunt.initConfig().
grunt.initConfig({
    lambda_deploy: {
        default: {
            arn: 'arn:aws:lambda:us-east-1:123456781234:function:my-function',
            options: {
                // Task-specific options go here.
            }
        }
    },
});

Options

arn
Type: String Default value: None - Required
The ARN of your target Lambda function.
function
Type: String Default value: None - Required (if you havn't specified an ARN)
This option is deprecated, use arn instead. The name of your target Lambda function, ie. the name of the function in the AWS console.
Proxy
On Linux based hosts you can set proxy server for deploy task by specifying standard environment variable - httpsproxy. E.g: env httpsproxy=http://localhost:8080 grunt deploy
package
Type: String Default value: Package name set by package task of same target - see below.
The name of the package to be uploaded.
When the lambdapackage task runs it sets the package value for the lambdadeploy target with the same name.
Therefore if lambdapackage and lambdadeploy have a target (eg. default) with the same name you will not need to provide this value - it will be passed automatically.
For example, your Gruntfile.js might contain the following:
grunt.initConfig({
    lambda_deploy: {
        default: {
            arn: 'arn:aws:lambda:us-east-1:123456781234:function:my-function'
        }
    },
    lambda_package: {
        default: {
        }
    }
});

You could then run grunt lambda_package lambda_deploy and it'll automatically create the package and deploy it without having to specify a package name.
options.profile
Type: String Default value: null
If you wish to use a specific AWS credentials profile you can specify it here, otherwise it will use the environment default. You can also specify it with the environment variable AWS_PROFILE
options.RoleArn
Type: String Default value: null
If you wish to assume a specific role from an EC2 instance you can specify it here, otherwise it will use the environment default.
options.accessKeyId
Type: String Default value: null
If you wish to use hardcoded AWS credentials you should specify the Access Key ID here
options.secretAccessKey
Type: String Default value: null
If you wish to use hardcoded AWS credentials you should specify the Secret Access Key here
options.credentialsJSON
Type: String Default value: null
If you wish to use hardcoded AWS credentials saved in a JSON file, put the path to the JSON here. The JSON must conform to the AWS format.
options.region
Type: String Default value: us-east-1
Specify the AWS region your functions will be uploaded to. Note that if an ARN is supplied this option is not required.
options.timeout
Type: Integer Default value: null Depending on your Lambda function, you might need to increase the timeout value. The default timeout assigned by AWS is currently 3 seconds. If you wish to increase this timeout set the value here.
options.memory
Type: Integer Default value: null
Sets the memory assigned to the function. If null then the current setting for the function will be used. Value is in MB and must be a multiple of 64.
options.handler
Type: String Default value: null
Sets the handler for your lambda function. If left null, the current setting will remain unchanged.
options.enableVersioning
Type: boolean Default value: false
When enabled each deployment creates a new version.
options.aliases
Type: String or Array Default value: null
If a string or an array of strings then creates these aliases. If versioning enabled then points to the created version, otherwise points to $LATEST.
It is recommended that enableVersioning is also enabled when using this feature.
Examples:
Creates one beta alias:
aliases: 'beta'

Creates two aliases, alias1 and alias2:
aliases: [
    'alias1',
    'alias2'
]
options.enablePackageVersionAlias
Type: boolean Default value: false
When enabled creates a second alias using the NPM package version. When the NPM package version is bumped a new alias will be created, allowing you to keep the old alias available for backward compatibility.
It is recommended that enableVersioning is also enabled when using this feature.
options.subnetIds
Type: Array Default value: null
A list of one or more subnet IDs in your VPC.
options.securityGroupIds
Type: Array Default value: null
A list of one or more security groups IDs in your VPC.
If your Lambda function accesses resources in a VPC you must provide at least one security group and one subnet ID. These must belong to the same VPC

Usage Examples

Default Options
In this example, the default options are used therefore if we have the following in our Gruntfile.js:
grunt.initConfig({
    lambda_deploy: {
        default: {
            arn: 'arn:aws:lambda:us-east-1:123456781234:function:my-function'
        }
    }
});
And now if you run grunt lambda_deploy your package should be created and uploaded to the specified function.
Increasing the Timeout Options to 10 seconds
In this example, the timeout value is increased to 10 seconds and set memory to 256mb.
grunt.initConfig({
    lambda_deploy: {
        default: {
            arn: 'arn:aws:lambda:us-east-1:123456781234:function:my-function',
            options: {
                timeout : 10,
                memory: 256
            }
        }
    }
});
Example with a beta and prod deployment configuration
Deploy to beta with deploy and to prod with deploy_prod:
grunt.initConfig({
    lambda_invoke: {
        default: {
        }
    },
    lambda_deploy: {
        default: {
            options: {
                aliases: 'beta',
                enableVersioning: true
            },
            arn: 'arn:aws:lambda:us-east-1:123456789123:function:myfunction'
        },
        prod: {
            options: {
                aliases: 'prod',
                enableVersioning: true
            },
            arn: 'arn:aws:lambda:us-east-1:123456789123:function:myfunction'
        }
    },
    lambda_package: {
        default: {
        },
        prod: {
        }
    }
});

grunt.registerTask('deploy', ['lambda_package', 'lambda_deploy:default']);
grunt.registerTask('deploy_prod', ['lambda_package', 'lambda_deploy:prod']);

Misc info

Streamlining deploy

You can combine the lambdapackage and lambdadeploy into a single deploy task by adding the following to your Gruntfile.js:
grunt.registerTask('deploy', ['lambda_package', 'lambda_deploy']);

You can then run grunt deploy to perform both these functions in one step.

AWS credentials

The AWS SDK is configured to look for credentials in the following order:
  1. an IAM Role (if running on EC2)
  2. an AWS CLI profile (from ~/.aws/credentials)
  3. environment variables (AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID, AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY, AWS_SESSION_TOKEN)
  4. a JSON file on disk
  5. Hardcoded credentials passed into grunt-aws

The preferred method of authenticating during local development is by providing credentials in ~/.aws/credentials, it should look something like this:
[default]
aws_access_key_id = <YOUR_ACCESS_KEY_ID>
aws_secret_access_key = <YOUR_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY>

For more information read this documentation.

AWS permissions

To run the deploy command the AWS credentials require permissions to access lambda including lambda:GetFunction, lambda:UploadFunction, lambda:UpdateFunctionCode, lambda:UpdateFunctionConfiguration and iam:PassRole for the role which is assigned to the function.
It is recommended that the following policy be applied to the user:
{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Sid": "Stmt1442787227063",
      "Action": [
        "lambda:GetFunction",
        "lambda:UploadFunction",
        "lambda:UpdateFunctionCode",
        "lambda:UpdateFunctionConfiguration",
        "lambda:GetAlias",
        "lambda:UpdateAlias",
        "lambda:CreateAlias",
        "lambda:PublishVersion"
      ],
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Resource": "arn:aws:lambda:*"
    },
    {
      "Sid": "Stmt1442787265773",
      "Action": [
        "iam:PassRole"
      ],
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Resource": "arn:aws:iam::<my_account_id>:role/<my_role_name>"
    }
  ]
}

Contributing

In lieu of a formal styleguide, take care to maintain the existing coding style. Add unit tests for any new or changed functionality. Lint and test your code using Grunt.

Release History

0.1.0

Initial release

0.2.0

Adding some unit tests, refactoring deploy task into single task and converting tasks to multitasks

0.3.0

Adding more warnings for various failure cases

0.4.0

0.5.0

  • Fixed issue where dotfiles weren't packaged - see issue 17
  • Fixed issue where task could be done before zip writing is finished - pull request by qen
  • Monkey patched node-archiver to force permissions to be 777 for all files in package - see issue 6

0.6.0

  • Fixing a minor issue caused by some code that shouldn't have been commented out.

0.7.0

  • Removing some unneeded files from the NPM package.

0.8.0

0.9.0

0.10.0

0.11.0

0.12.0

0.13.0