pync

Utilities for promises pync ~= promise + async

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pync
Utilities for promises pync ~= promise + async
Promise.all() is very useful but it runs all promises in parallel. Pync solves that.
For example we have a function like this:
function somethingAsync(value) {
  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    console.log('starting', value)
    setTimeout(() => {
      console.log('finishing', value)
      resolve(`result ${value}`)
    }, 100)
  })
}

Then we use Promise.all():
Promise.all([1, 2, 3].map((value) => somethingAsync(value)))
  .then((results) => console.log('done', results))

We will see:
starting 1
starting 2
starting 3
finishing 1
finishing 2
finishing 3
done [ 'result 1', 'result 2', 'result 3' ]

This means all promises are started at once. What if we want to run one after another? Imagine you have an array of URLs and you want to download the files pointed by them. You probably don't want to download all at once. pync solves that with these methods:

pync.series(arr, func)

const pync = require('pync')

const arr = [1, 2, 3]
pync.series(arr, (value) => somethingAsync(value))
  .then(() => console.log('done'))

This is the output:
starting 1
finishing 1
starting 2
finishing 2
starting 3
finishing 3
done

pync.map(arr, func)

const pync = require('pync')

const arr = [1, 2, 3]
pync.map(arr, (value) => somethingAsync(value))
  .then((results) => console.log('done', results))

This is the output:
starting 1
finishing 1
starting 2
finishing 2
starting 3
finishing 3
done [ 'result 1', 'result 2', 'result 3' ]

pync.dict(arr, func)

Given an array of strings it will call func for each string and finally construct an object with all the keys mapped to the values returned by func.
const pync = require('pync')

const arr = ['foo.txt', 'bar.txt']
pync.dict(arr, (filename) => readFileAsync(filename))
  .then((results) => console.log('done', results))

This is the output:
done { 'foo.txt': 'contents of foo.txt', 'bar.txt': 'contents of bar.txt' }

pync.whilst(test, func, initialValue)

It executes a given function func whilst a given function test returns a truly value. The test function must be synchronous and it's always evaluated before func. You can pass an initial value, in which case both the test and func functions will receive it as an argument. Then, the value returned by func will be passed to the next iteration, so both test and func will receive it. And when finally test returns a falsy value, the latest value returned by func will be returned by pync.whilst()
const pync = require('pync')

const test = (totalAffectedRows) => totalAffectedRows < 1000
const func = (totalAffectedRows) => db.someBatchUpdate().then((result) => result.affectedRows + totalAffectedRows)
pync.whilst(test, func, 0)
  .then((totalAffectedRows) => console.log('total affected rows', totalAffectedRows))
Index
All iteratees receive the current iteration number as second parameter.
Installing
npm install pync --save