react-context-consumer-hoc

React context consumer HOC. Consumes context as props.

Downloads in past

Stats

StarsIssuesVersionUpdatedCreatedSize
react-context-consumer-hoc
1892.1.14 years ago4 years agoMinified + gzip package size for react-context-consumer-hoc in KB

Readme

react-context-consumer-hoc v2.x
React context consumer hoc. A 2KB lib that consumes context as props.

NPM JavaScript Style Guide Build Status Package Quality

Install

npm install --save react-context-consumer-hoc

Documentation

- withContextAsProps(Context1[, Context2, ..., ContextN]) - withContext(contextList, mapContextToProps) - UNSAFE_withContext(Context1[, Context2, ..., ContextN]) - Wrap connected component - noRef

The Gist

Using withContextAsProps
// ContextA == { a: 1 } && ContextB == { b: 1 }
const InnerComponent = ({ a, b, ...ownProps }) => { /* ... */ }
const MyComponent = withContextAsProps(ContextA, ContextB)(InnerComponent)

Using withContext
// ContextA == { a: 1 } && ContextB == { b: 1 }
const InnerComponent = ({ c, ...ownProps }) => { /* ... */ }
const MyComponent = withContext(
  [ContextA, ContextB],
  (context, ownProps) => ({ c: context.a + context.b }) // mapContextToProps
)(InnerComponent)

Using reselect -> createSelector()
const addAandB = createSelector(
  (context) => context.a,
  (context) => context.b,
  (a, b) => a + b
)

// ContextABC == { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 }
const InnerComponent = ({ sum, ...ownProps }) => { /* ... */ }
const MyComponent = withContext(
  [ContextABC],
  (context, ownProps) => ({ sum: addAandB(context) }) // mapContextToProps
)(InnerComponent)

Namespaces with reselect -> createStructuredSelector()
// ContextA == { a: 1 } && ContextB == { b: 1 }
const InnerComponent = ({ context: { a, b }, ...ownProps }) => { /* ... */ }
const MyComponent = withContext(
  [ContextA, ContextB],
  createStructuredSelector({
    context: createStructuredSelector({
      a: (context) => context.a,
      b: (context) => context.b
    })
  })
)(InnerComponent)

API

withContextAsProps

withContextAsProps(Context1[, Context2, ..., ContextN])(Component)
Wraps the Component with dynamically created consumers and passes all consumed context as props. withContextAsProps is a facade around withContext, providing a convenient API for the most common use cases.

Arguments

  • Context1[, Context2, ..., ContextN] (Comma-separated context list | required): At least 1 context API is needed. The component will be wrapped in consumers from each of the context passed to withContextAsProps.

All react-context-consumer-hoc APIs wrap the new component once at export, i.e. there is no further computation done afterward.
> Note: in advanced scenarios where you need more control over the rendering performance, it is recommended to use withContext. In this case, you can pass a mapContextToProps function where you can specify which props from the context to select for a particular component instance. Most apps will not need this as long as the context doesn't change too often. One scenario could be if one of the context gets recomputed on every render but only a few really care about the changes.

withContext

withContext(contextList, mapContextToProps)(Component)
Wraps the Component with dynamically created consumers and passes all consumed context as props.

Arguments

  • contextList (Array | required): A list of context API with at least 1. The component will be wrapped in consumers from each of the context in the array.
  • mapContextToProps(context, ownProps): contextPropsObject (Function | required): This function is called with 2 arguments and must return an object conatining the props that will be passed to the component. The first argument is the consumed context from the APIs and the second argument is the props that are being passed to the component. mapContextToProps must return an object Note that this function is called on every render and the object returned will be destructured/passed as props to the component.

> Use reselect to efficiently compose selectors using memoization

UNSAFEwithContext

WARNING: deprecated Will be removed in v3. This method passes a new object everytime the top-most component is rendered, causing issues with PureComponents, and anything that implements a shallow comparison (triple equal).

UNSAFE_withContext(Context1[, Context2, ..., ContextN])(Component)
Wraps the Component with dynamically created consumers and passes all consumed context wrapped in a new object called context. This method was kept to keep compatibility with the previous implementation but it is recommended not to use it.
This method can be refactored using namespaces with reselect -> createStructuredSelector().

Arguments

  • Context1[, Context2, ..., ContextN] (Comma-separated context list | required): At least 1 context API is needed. The component will be wrapped in consumers from each of the context passed to withContextAsProps.

All react-context-consumer-hoc APIs wrap the new component once at export, i.e. there is no further computation done afterward.

Full example

// ProviderA.js
import React from 'react'
const childContextA = { a: 1 }
export const ContextA = React.createContext(childContextA)
export default ({ children }) => (
  <ContextA.Provider value={childContextA}>
    {children}
  </ContextA.Provider>
)

// ProviderB.js
import React from 'react'
const childContextB = { b: 2 }
export const ContextB = React.createContext(childContextB)
export default ({ children }) => (
  <ContextB.Provider value={childContextB}>
    {children}
  </ContextB.Provider>
)

// MyComponent.js
import React, { Component } from 'react'
import PropTypes from 'prop-types'
import { withContextAsProps } from 'react-context-consumer-hoc'
import { ContextA } from './ProviderA'
import { ContextB } from './ProviderB'

class MyComponent extends Component {
  static propTypes = {
    // from context
    a: PropTypes.number.isRequired,
    b: PropTypes.number.isRequired,
    
    // own props
    c: PropTypes.number.isRequired
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <div>{this.props.a}</div>
        <div>{this.props.b}</div>
        <div>{this.props.c}</div>
      </div>
    )
  }
}

export default withContextAsProps(ContextA, ContextB)(MyComponent)

// App.js
import React, { Component } from 'react'
import ProviderA from './ProviderA'
import ProviderB from './ProviderB'
import MyComponent from './MyComponent'

export default class App extends Component {
  render () {
    return (
      <ProviderA>
        <ProviderB>
          <div className='stuff'>some other content</div>
          <div className='nested element'>
            <MyComponent c="3" />
          </div>
        </ProviderB>
      </ProviderA>
    )
  }
}

Issue with react-redux

There is a bug with react-redux and React.forwardRef, see issue #6
for more information.
Basically, react-context-consumer-hoc uses React.forwardRef which returns an object and we currently can't pass an object to react-redux -> connect()(/* here */). Don't worry, react-redux is aware of this issue and they are working on it.
There are 2 workarounds which will most likely break option withRef of react-redux -> connect().

Wrap connected component

// The same thing can be done using withContextAsProps and UNSAFE_withContext
export default withContext(
  [...],
  function mapContextToProps(context, ownProps) { /* ... */ }
)(
  connect(
    function mapStateToProps(state, ownProps) { /* ... */ }
  )(MyComponent)
)

noRef

[withContext|withContextAsProps|UNSAFE_withContext].noRef
noRef is a simple wrapper built on top of all APIs which wraps the topmost consumer with a stateless function component (a function). to work around the react-redux -> connect() bug with React.forwardRef, see issue #6 for more information.
export default connect(
  function mapStateToProps(state, ownProps) { /* ... */ }
)(
  withContextAsProps.noRef(...)(MyComponent)
  // or withContext.noRef([...], mapContextToProps)(MyComponent)
  // or UNSAFE_withContext.noRef(...)(MyComponent)
)

Author

Contributors

| pablo garcia
pablo garcia
💻 📖 💡 | | :---: | This project follows the all-contributors specification.
Package Quality