react-overflow-indicator

- Let users know when there’s more content to see in an `overflow` container, in case their device hides scrollbars. - Uses [Intersection Observer](https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/IntersectionObserver) for performance and accuracy –

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Readme

react-overflow-indicator ⏬
  • Let users know when there’s more content to see in an overflow container, in
case their device hides scrollbars.
  • Uses
Intersection Observer for performance and accuracy – no listening for scroll or resize events.
  • Flexible: render any style of indicator you want (shadows, arrows, messages,
etc.) wherever you want, using any styling solution.
Some examples: shadows, fades, icons…

Shadow animated demo

Fade animated demo

Icon animated demo

Quick Start

Install:
$ yarn add react-overflow-indicator

Import:
import Overflow from 'react-overflow-indicator';

Render indicators automatically using <Overflow.Indicator> inside of <Overflow>:
<Overflow>
  <Overflow.Content>
    Render an element or put your content directly here…
  </Overflow.Content>
  <Overflow.Indicator direction="down">👇</Overflow.Indicator>
</Overflow>

…or, use the onStateChange prop to react to overflow however you like:
const [canScroll, setCanScroll] = useState(false);

return (
  <>
    <Overflow onStateChange={state => setCanScroll(state.canScroll.down)}>
      <Overflow.Content>
        Render an element or put your content directly here…
      </Overflow.Content>
    </Overflow>
    {canScroll ? '👇' : '🌈'}
  </>
);

API

Overflow

The overflow state provider. At a minimum it must contain an <Overflow.Content> element, otherwise it will do nothing.
<Overflow>
  <Overflow.Content>
    Your element(s) here!
  </Overflow.Content>
<Overflow>

As with any standard element, its height must be limited in some way in order for it to actually scroll. Apply that style as you would any other element, with style or className:
<Overflow style={{ maxHeight: 500 }}>…</Overflow>

Usage with styled-components:
const MyContainer = styled(Overflow)`
  max-height: 500px;
`;

Any remaining props beyond those documented below will be passed along to the underlying DOM element. Use this to pass className, style, or any other native attribute.

Props

Name Type Default Description
children Node
Elements to render inside the outer container. This should include an <Overflow.Content> element at a minimum, but should also include your scroll indicators if you’d like to overlay them on the scrollable viewport.
onStateChange Function
Callback that receives the latest overflow state and an object of refs, if you’d like to react to overflow in a custom way.
tolerance One of…
  Number
  String
0
Distance (number of pixels or CSS length unit like 1em) to the edge of the content at which to consider the viewport fully scrolled. For example, if set to 10, then it will consider scrolling to have reached the end as long as it’s within 10 pixels of the border. You can use this when your content has padding and scrolling close to the edge should be good enough.

Overflow.Content

Wrapper for content to render inside the scrollable viewport. This element will grow to whatever size it needs to hold its content, and will cause the parent viewport element to overflow. It must be rendered inside an <Overflow> ancestor.
Although you can style this element directly by passing additional props like className and style, it’s preferable to include styling on your own element inside <Overflow.Content> instead – otherwise you risk interfering with the styles this component needs to function.

Props

Name Type Default Description
children Node
Content to render inside the scrollable viewport.

Overflow.Indicator

A helper component for rendering your custom indicator when the viewport is scrollable in a particular direction (or any direction). Must be rendered inside an <Overflow> ancestor.
You can provide a direction prop to indicate when scrolling is allowed in a particular direction:
<Overflow>
  <Overflow.Content>…</Overflow.Content>
  <Overflow.Indicator direction="right">👉</Overflow.Indicator>
</Overflow>

…or exclude it to indicate when scrolling is allowed in any direction:
<Overflow>
  <Overflow.Content>…</Overflow.Content>
  <Overflow.Indicator>←↕→</Overflow.Indicator>
</Overflow>

This component will mount its children when scrolling is allowed in the requested direction, and unmount them otherwise. If you’d rather remain mounted (to allow transitions, for example), then render a function. It will be supplied with a Boolean (if direction is supplied) or an object with up, left, right, and down properties:
<Overflow>
  <Overflow.Indicator direction="down">
    {canScroll => (canScroll ? '🔽' : '✅')}
  </Overflow.Indicator>
</Overflow>

Props

Name Type Default Description
children One of…
  Node
  Function

Indicator to render when scrolling is allowed in the requested direction. If given a function, it will be passed the overflow state and an object containing the viewport ref. You can use this refs parameter to render an indicator that is also a button that scrolls the viewport (for example).
direction One of…
  'up'
  'down'
  'left'
  'right'

The scrollabe direction to watch for. If not supplied, the indicator will be active when scrolling is allowed in any direction.

useOverflow

This hook provides full access to the Overflow’s context containing its current state and refs. While <Overflow.Indicator> should be good enough for most use cases, you can use this if you have other use cases in mind. Must be used inside an <Overflow> ancestor.
Returns an object like:
{
  state: {
    canScroll: {
      up: Boolean,
      left: Boolean,
      right: Boolean,
      down: Boolean
    }
  },
  dispatch: Function,
  tolerance: Number | String,
  refs: {
    viewport: Object
  }
}

Examples

Make the indicator a button that scrolls the viewport

<Overflow.Indicator direction="down">
  {(canScroll, refs) => (
    <button
      type="button"
      onClick={() => {
        refs.viewport.current.scrollBy({
          top: refs.viewport.current.clientHeight,
          behavior: 'smooth'
        });
      }}
      style={{ position: 'absolute', right: 10, bottom: 10 }}
    >
      {canScroll ? '⏬' : '✅'}
    </button>
  )}
</Overflow.Indicator>

Implementation Details

Instead of the traditional method of listening for scroll and resize events, this uses the more performant Intersection Observer API.
Here, an IntersectionObserver watches each of the 4 sides of the viewport element to see when the scrollable content extends past that edge.

What’s the purpose of each element?

When rendered, you’ll see a structure similar to this:
<div data-overflow-wrapper>
  <div data-overflow-viewport>
    <div data-overflow-content>
      <div data-overflow-tolerance></div> (Optional)
      Finally, your scrollable content here…
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

That seems like a lot! But each one serves a purpose – various CSS and DOM behaviors make this surprisingly difficult to implement otherwise.
From the top down:
  • The element with data-scrollable-wrapper contains everything. If you want to
insert some indicator overlay (like shadows, an arrow, a floating message), they should usually be children of this element so that they’ll be siblings of the scrollable viewport and thus will remain in their positions instead of scrolling away. When you define a height or max-height to define the scrollable viewport size, it will be on this element.
  • The element with data-scrollable-viewport is the one with overflow: auto.
It will match the size of its parent (the data-scrollable-wrapper). Any indicators you render will usually be siblings of this element.
  • The element with data-scrollable-content contains your content. It will grow
to whatever size it needs and potentially cause the data-scrollable-viewport element to overflow.
  • The element with data-scrollable-tolerance will optionally be inserted if
you use a nonzero tolerance value; in that case, this element will be observed instead of the content element.