tedious-promises

Wraps Tedious SQL commands with Q promises.

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Readme

Wraps Tedious SQL commands with Q or es6 promises. Uses fluent syntax

Whats new?

  • Transaction support (beta)
  • Alternate return data formats (see Row Transformers)
  • Should support any promise library

Install

$ npm install --save tedious-promises

Configure

Sample: config.json See the Tedious documentation for configuration details.

{
  "userName": "user",
  "password": "pass",
  "server": "server",
  "options": {
    "database": "dbo",
    "encrypt": true,
  }
}

Initialization without connection pooling

var tp = require('tedious-promises');
var dbConfig = require('config.json');
var TYPES = require('tedious').TYPES;
tp.setConnectionConfig(dbConfig); // global scope

Initialization with connection pooling

var tp = require('tedious-promises');
var dbConfig = require('config.json');
var TYPES = require('tedious').TYPES;
var ConnectionPool = require('tedious-connection-pool');
var poolConfig = {}; // see tedious-connection-pool documentation
var pool = new ConnectionPool(poolConfig, dbConfig);
tp.setConnectionPool(pool); // global scope

Configure automatic column renaming

The callback can be any function that accepts a single string parameter, and returns a string.
var _ = require('lodash');
tp.setDefaultColumnRenamer(_.camelCase); // global scope

Use

Basic usage

tp.sql("SELECT col1, col2 FROM dbo.table")
  .execute()
  .then(function(results) {
    // do something with the results
  }).fail(function(err) {
    // do something with the failure
  });
  
  
results === [{
  col1: 'row 1 col 1',
  col2: 'row 1 col 2'
}, {
  col1: 'row 2 col 1',
  col2: 'row 2 col 2'
}]

Overriding column behavior

tp.sql("SELECT col1, col2, col3, col4 FROM dbo.table")
  .column('col1', 'firstName') // rename column
  .column('col2', 'lastName')
  .column('col3', 'nameParts.first') // create 'nameParts' object with 'first' property
  .column('col4', 'nameParts.last')
  .execute()
  .then(function(results) {
    // do something with the results
  }).fail(function(err) {
    // do something with the failure
  });

Column types conversion

asBoolean can convert from:
  • null === null
  • Any integer: 0 === false
  • strings:
'TRUE','T', 'Y', 'YES', '1' 'FALSE', 'F', 'N', 'NO', '0'
asDate can convert from:
  • null === null
  • integer: new Date(value)
  • string: Date.parse(value)

tp.sql("SELECT col1, col2 FROM dbo.table")
  .column('col1').asBoolean()
  .column('col2').asDate()
  .execute()
  .then(function(results) {
    // do something with the results
  }).fail(function(err) {
    // do something with the failure
  });

In a function returning the promise, with a parameter

function getData(id) {
  return tp.sql("SELECT col1, col2, FROM table WHERE id_col = @id")
    .parameter('id', TYPES.Int, id)
    .execute();
}

Returning the generated key from an identity column

(Technically, you don't need to use 'as id', but it makes the code easier to read.)
tp.sql("INSERT INTO table (col1, col2) VALUES ('x','y'); SELECT @@identity as id")
  .execute()
  .then(function(results) {
    console.log(results[0].id);
  });

Handeling each row yourself

tp.sql("SELECT * FROM table")
  .forEachRow(function(row) {
    // do something with the row
  })
  .execute()
  .then(function(results) {
    // result is row count 
  }).fail(function(err) {
    // do something with the failure
  });

Return row count instead of data

Only usefull for INSERT, UPDATE, and DELETE statements
tp.sql("insert into table (col1, col2) values('qwerty', '123')" )
  .returnRowCount()
  .execute()
  .then(function(rowCount) {
    // done, you have the modified row count
  }).fail(function(err) {
    // do something with the failure
  });

Row transformers

  • 'rowToObject' (default) converts each row into an object where the column names become the keys
[{
  col1: 'row 1 col 1',
  col2: 'row 1 col 2'
}, {
  col1: 'row 2 col 1',
  col2: 'row 2 col 2'
}]

  • 'rowToArray' converts each row into an array of values
[
  ['row 1 col 1', 'row 1 col 2'], 
  ['row 2 col 1', 'row 2 col 2']
]

  • You can also pass in a function to do your own row transformation.
function customTransformer(row, getColumnMap) {
  result = []; // Or {}, or anything you'd like

  for (var i = 0; i < row.length; i++) {
    var col = row[i];
    var name = col.metadata.colName;
    
    // The getColumnMap function returns the built in column mappings.  
    // The GetColumnValue function returns the columns value after being 
    // processed by transformers like asBoolean() and asDate().
    // See TediousPromiseColumn.js for other column functions.
    var map = this.GetColumnMap(name);
    var value = map.GetColumnValue(col)
    
    // do something with the column name and value
  }

  return result;
}

Promises

The execute function returns a promise (as do the transaction functions).
By default this is a Q promise. es6 promises are also supported out of the box, but you should be able to use any promise library by writing a small polyfill.

es6 Promises

// Set when you initialize TP to make it global
tp.setConnectionPool(poolConfig);
tp.setPromiseLibrary('es6');

// You can also set the promise library on specific sql commands
return tp.sql('SELECT something FROM something')
  .setPromiseLibrary('es6')
  .execute();

Transactions

Transaction support in Tedious has been around for a long time, but it's new to Tedious Promises. So consider it beta for now. It is possible that there will be breaking changes in the future. (Initial implemetation by @akanieski)
var trans;

// create the transaction from the a tp instance
tp.beginTransaction()
  .then(function(newTransaction) {
    // remember the transaction, you'll need it later
    trans = newTransaction;

    // use the transaction like a normal tp instance
    // ('return' chains the promises)
    return trans.sql(testSql)
      .returnRowCount()
      .execute();
  })
  .then(function(testResult) {
    // this is the result of executing testSql on the transaction
    // do something with it
    
    // you can execute another sql statement using the same syntax as above
    // i.e. return trans.sql(...

    // when you're done using the transaction, commit it
    return trans.commitTransaction();
  })
  .fail(function(err) {
    // rollback on failures
    return trans.rollbackTransaction();
  })

Mocking for unit tests

Set the global mock function instead of setConnectionConfig or setConnectionPool to intercept all calls to tp.execute()
tp.setMockDataCallback(function(sql, parameters) { 
  if(sql === 'Select...' && parameters.id.value === 123) {
    return data; // an array of the objects you'd normally get back 
  }
  
  return [];
});


parameters === {
  id: {
    name: 'id',
    type: TYPES.Int,
    value: 123,
    options: null
  }
}

Setup end to end testing

  1. Create a SQL database either in Azure or locally
Sample user setup and permissions are in test/database/init.sql
  1. Create test/database/config.json based upon the sample below
Replace all REQUIRED fields with your database credentials This file is git ignored so that it isn't accidently checked in
  1. Run grunt resetTestDatabase to create the tables and populate test data
  2. Run grunt to run the tests, or grunt watch to run the test on every file change

{
  "userName": "REQUIRED",
  "password": "REQUIRED",
  "server": "REQUIRED",
  "options": {
    "database": "REQUIRED",
    "encrypt": true,
    "debug": {
      "packet": false
    }
  }
}

To do

License

MIT © Charles Hill