wise-promise

Native nodejs promises extended with powerful functionality

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This is a subclass of native Node.js promises.
Native promises saw a huge performance boost in Node.js v8.0.0, eliminating the need for bloated promise libraries like bluebird. Native promises are now safer, cleaner, and have become the new best practice.
Unfortunately, native promises alone lack many powerful utilities that libraries like bluebird provide. wise-promise extends native promises to provide that same power.

Installation

npm install --save wise-promise

Usage

const Promise = require('wise-promise');

const promise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
  get('http://www.google.com', (err, res) => {
    if (err) reject(err);
    else resolve(res);
  });
});
API

new Promise(handler)

This creates and returns a new promise. handler must be a function with the following signature:
function handler(resolve, reject)
1. resolve is a function that should be called with a single argument. If it is called with a non-promise value then the promise is fulfilled with that value. If it is called with a promise, then the constructed promise takes on the state of that promise. 2. reject is a function that should be called with a single argument. The returned promise will be rejected with that argument.

.then(onFulfilled, onRejected) -> promise

This method conforms to the Promises/A+ spec.
If you are new to promises, the following resources are available: - Matt Greer's promise tutorial - HTML5 Rocks's promise tutorial - Promises.org's introduction to promises - David Walsh's article on promises
If they are provided, onFulfilled and onRejected should be functions.

.catch(predicate, onRejected) -> promise

Sugar for .then(null, onRejected), to mirror catch in synchronous code.
If a predicate is specified, the onRejected handler will only catch exceptions that match the predicate.
The predicate can be:
  • an Error class
- example: .catch(TypeError, func)
  • a filter function
- example: .catch(err => err.statusCode === 404, func)
  • an array of accepted predicates
- example: .catch([TypeError, SyntaxError, is404], func)

.catchLater() -> this

Prevents this promise from triggering an Unhandled Rejection. This is useful if you plan on handling the promise at a later point in time.

.finally(handler) -> promise

Pass a handler that will be called regardless of this promise's fate. The handler will be invoked with no arguments, and it cannot change the promise chain's current fulfillment value or rejection reason. If handler returns a promise, the promise returned by .finally will not be settled until that promise is settled.
This method is primarily used for cleanup operations.

.tap(handler) -> promise

Like .finally, but the handler will not be called if this promise is rejected. The handler cannot change the promise chain's fulfillment value, but it can delay chained promises by returning an unsettled promise (just like .finally). The handler is invoked with a single argument: the fulfillment value of the previous promise.
This method is primarily used for side-effects.

.tapError(handler) -> promise

The opposite of .tap. The given handler will only be invoked if this promise is rejected. Unlike .catch, however, the returned promise will still be rejected with the original rejection reason. Just like .tap and .finally, the handler can delay chained promises by returning an unsettled promise. The handler is invoked with a single argument: the rejection reason of the previous promise.

.become(fulfilledValue, rejectedValue) -> promise

Sugar for .then(() => fulfilledValue).
If a second argument is passed, it is equivilent to .then(() => fulfilledValue, () => rejectedValue).

.else(predicate, value) -> promise

Sugar for .catch(() => value). This method is used for providing default values on a rejected promise chain. Predicates are supported, just like with the .catch method.

.delay(milliseconds) -> promise

Returns a new promise chained from this one, whose fulfillment is delayed by the specified number of milliseconds from when it would've been fulfilled otherwise. Rejections are not delayed.

.timeout(milliseconds, reason) -> promise

Returns a new promise chained from this one. However, if this promise does not settle within the specified number of milliseconds, the returned promise will be rejected with a TimeoutError.
If you specify a string reason, the TimeoutError will have reason as its message. Otherwise, a default message will be used. If reason is an instanceof Error, it will be used instead of a TimeoutError.
TimeoutError is available at Promise.TimeoutError.

.log(prefix) -> promise

Conveniently logs the state and value of the promise when it becomes fulfilled or rejected.
If prefix is provided, it will be prepended to the logged value, separated by a space character.

static Promise.resolve(value) -> promise

Creates a promise that is resolved with the given value. If you pass a promise or promise-like object, the returned promise takes on the state of that promise-like object (fulfilled or rejected).

static Promise.reject(value) -> promise

Creates a promise that is rejected with the given value (usually an Error object) as its rejection reason.

static Promise.race(iterable) -> promise

Returns a promise that will fulfill or reject with the same value/exception as the first fulfilled/rejected promise in the iterable argument.
Non-promise values in the iterable are treated like already-fulfilled promises.

static Promise.all(iterable) -> promise

Returns a promise for an iterable of promises. The returned promise will be rejected if any of the promises in iterable are rejected. Otherwise, it will be fulfilled with an array of each fulfillment value, respectively.
Non-promise values in the iterable are treated like already-fulfilled promises.
Promise.all([Promise.resolve('a'), 'b', Promise.resolve('c')])
  .then(function (results) {
    assert(results[0] === 'a')
    assert(results[1] === 'b')
    assert(results[2] === 'c')
  })

static Promise.any(iterable) -> promise

Returns a promise for an iterable of promises. It will be fulfilled with the value of the first fulfilled promise in iterable. If all of the given promises reject, it will be rejected with the rejection reason of the promise that rejected first.
Non-promise values in the iterable are treated like already-fulfilled promises.

static Promise.props(object) -> promise

Like Promise.all, but for an object's properties instead of iterated values. Returns a promise that will be resolved with an object that has fulfillment values at respective keys to the original object. Only the object's own enumerable properties are considered.
Non-promise values in the object are treated like already-fulfilled promises.
Promise.props({ users: getUsers(), news: getNews() })
  .then(function (results) {
    console.log(results.users)
    console.log(results.news)
  })

static Promise.settle(iterable) -> promise

Given an iterable of promises, returns a promise that fulfills with an array of promise descriptor objects.
If the corresponding input promise is: - fulfilled, the descriptor will be { state: 'fulfilled', value: <fulfillmentValue> } - rejected, the descriptor will be { state: 'rejected', reason: <rejectionReason> }
Non-promise values in the iterable are treated like already-fulfilled promises.

static Promise.after(milliseconds, value) -> promise

Returns a promise that will be resolved with value after the specified number of milliseconds. By default, value is undefined.
If value is a promise itself, the returned promise will adopt the state of value after the specified number of milliseconds.

static Promise.isPromise(value) -> boolean

Returns either true or false, whether value is a promise-like object (i.e., it has a .then method).

static Promise.promisify(function, options) -> function

Takes a function which accepts a node style callback and returns a new function that returns a promise instead.
const fs = require('fs')
const read = Promise.promisify(fs.readFile)

const promise = read('foo.json', 'utf8')
  .then(str => JSON.parse(str))

There are two possible options: - multiArgs
* Setting this option to `true` means the resulting promise will always fulfill with an array of the callback's success values (arguments after the first).
- deoptimize
* Setting this option to `true` can potentially improve the performance of functions that are frequently passed a widely varying number of arguments (and typically a very high number of arguments). In most cases though, this option will reduce the performance of the function.

static Promise.nodeify(function) -> function

Takes a promise-returning function, and returns a new function that instead accepts a node style callback as its last argument. The newly created function will always return its this value.
const callbackAPI = Promise.nodeify(promiseAPI)

callbackAPI('foo', 'bar', function (err, result) {
  // handle error or result here
})

License

MIT